Teaching

 

The classroom is the main place where philosophers make a contribution to society and future generations. Teaching is therefore very important to me.  While working towards my PhD at NYU, I have gained experience teaching my own class and have also sought out sustained pedagogical training. I am deeply committed to helping each of my student to thrive and to develop the analytical reasoning skills needed inside and outside of philosophy.

Teaching Experience

As Sole Instructor

I taught an undergraduate introduction to metaphysics at NYU in Summer 2016. The class had 11 students (with a maximum enrollment of 12), and focused on ontology and metaontology. 

As Teaching Assistant

  • History of Ancient Philosophy, Professor Jessica Moss (NYU), Fall 2016 and Fall 2018

  • Great Works in Philosophy, Professor John Richardson (NYU), Fall 2015

  • Metaphysics, Professor Kit Fine (NYU), Spring 2015

  • Minds and Machines, Professor Ned Block (NYU), Fall 2014

  • Introduction to Philosophy, Professor Tobias Rosefeldt (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin), Fall 2011/12

For each of the five classes at NYU, I taught (or am teaching) two recitations with 18-21 students in each, and graded on average 4-5 papers and exams. For the class at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, I taught two recitations with about 10 students in each, corrected weekly exercise sheets, and also helped to grade the final exam.

Guest Lectures

  • “Aristotle on the Soul (De Anima I.1, I.4, II.1, III.4)”, for a course on The History of Ancient Philosophy taught by Professor Jessica Moss at NYU, Fall 2018

  • “Carnap’s Distinction between ‘Internal’ and ‘External’ Questions” for an undergraduate course on the Philosophy of Mathematics taught by Eddy Keming Chen at Rutgers, Fall 2016

  • “From Hume to Kant”, for the course on Great Works in Philosophy taught by Professor John Richardson at NYU, Fall 2015

  • “David Lewis, Many but Almost One”, for the course on Metaphysics taught by Professor Kit Fine at NYU, Spring 2015

  • “Concept Pragmatism”, for the course on Philosophy of Mind taught by Professor Ned Block at NYU, Fall 2014

Pedagogical Training

  • I have successfully completed “Preparing Future Faculty I: The Art & Craft of Teaching”, a semester-long course on the theory and practice of university teaching at NYU.

  • I have also successfully completed the semester-long course “Preparing Future Faculty II: Success through Communication”, which builds on “Preparing Future Faculty I”.

  • I strive to create an inclusive classroom atmosphere, and have participated in the following 3 hour long diversity trainings at NYU:

    • SafeZone, a workshop designed to build the capacity of participants to help create inclusive spaces for LGBTQ community members.

    • JusticeZone, a workshop designed to facilitate understanding of concepts such as 'diversity', 'equity', and 'social justice' through the lens of race and racism.

    • FaithZone, a workshop to promote informed dialogue about religion and spirituality on campus and beyond.

  • I have received 14 hours of training in Nonviolent Communication through the New York Center for Nonviolent Communication (NYCNVC). Nonviolent Communication is a communication and conflict resolution technique which supposes that communicative acts always express universal human needs. These needs never conflict, though strategies for meeting them may clash. 

Sample Syllabi

  1. Undergraduate Introduction to Metaphysics

    I have taught this class at NYU in Summer 2016.

  2. Undergraduate Introduction to the Philosophy of Language

    This syllabus is intended for a biweekly course with weekly tutorials, which is a common lecture format at NYU.

  3. Undergraduate Introduction to Feminist Philosophy

    This syllabus is also intended for a biweekly course with weekly tutorials.

  4. Graduate Course on the History of Analytic Philosophy

    This course focuses on the Quine-Carnap debate.

Please cite or ask permission before using these syllabi.

Philosophy Taboo

Playing this game requires that you (or your students) collect 50-100 philosophical terms that were covered during the term. For one of my classes on ancient philosophy, these terms included ‘void’, ‘essence’, ‘materialist’, and similar. Write these terms down on index cards, together with 5 “forbidden words” on each card. The game is then played in two groups and proceeds in several rounds. In each round, a player has two minutes to explain as many philosophical terms as possible to his or her group, without using any of the forbidden words. A player of the opposite group keeps watch that none of the forbidden words are used. This game encourages free associations between the students’ previous knowledge base and the new, philosophical vocabulary. It is also a lot of fun.